gazette-no-24

Edition No. 24, 29 November 2016 is now available on the APVMA website. As a subscriber, you will receive an email notification each time a new Gazette is published.

CONTENTS
Erratum Notice – page 3
Agricultural Chemical Products and Approved Labels – page 4
Veterinary Chemical Products and Approved Labels – page 8
Approved Active Constituents – page 10
Approved Active Constituents—Veterinary – page 11
Approved Active Constituents—Veterinary – page 15
Amendments to the APVMA MRL Standard – page 27
Proposal to amend Schedule 20 in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code – page 28
Variations to Schedule 20 of the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code – page 32
Cancellation of a Label Approval at the Request of the Holder – page 37
Extension of the Suspension of Quintozene Active Constituent Approval Number 53706 and Certain Product Registrations and Label Approvals – page 38
Sero-X Insecticide Containing Clitoria Ternatea Extract  – page 41

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IFN 20-16 – Changes to the analysis of cooked and processed or manufactured meat that is ready-to-eat

Purpose

The purpose of this notice is to advise brokers and importers about upcoming changes to the inspection and analysis of cooked and processed meat that is ready-to-eat. This notice also applies to the inspection and analysis of cooked and manufactured meat that is ready-to-eat.

These changes are being made following the department’s consideration of the Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) risk statement for ready-to-eat cooked and processed meat products. This risk statement is available here.

What has changed?

From 14 December 2016, cooked and processed meat that is ready-to-eat will be inspected and analysed on the basis of whether the food is either:

  • cooked and processed dried meat that is ready-to-eat. This includes cooked and manufactured dried meat that is ready-to-eat; or
  • cooked and processed meat, other than dried meat, that is ready-to-eat. This includes cooked and manufactured meat, other than dried meat, that is ready-to-eat.

To implement this change an amended lodgement question will apply for cooked and processed meat.
From 14 December 2016, the following Community Protection (CP) question (lodgement question) will apply to goods lodged in the ICS:

IFIS: ARE THE GOODS COOKED AND PROCESSED MEAT THAT REQUIRE REFRIGERATION (CHILLED OR FROZEN) AND DO NOT REQUIRE FURTHER COOKING?

Answering ‘No’ to this lodgement question will mean that the cooked and processed meat will not be referred to the Imported Food Inspection Scheme for inspection and analysis as a risk food.

Cooked and processed dried meat that is ready-to-eat

From 14 December 2016, cooked and processed dried meat that is ready-to-eat may continue to be analysed for pesticide residues and will not be analysed for Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli or coagulase positive staphylococci.

Cooked and processed meat, other than dried meat, that is ready-to-eat

From 14 December 2016, the following changes will apply to cooked and processed meat that is ready-to-eat (other than cooked and processed dried meat that is ready-to-eat):

  • The analysis for Listeria monocytogenes will continue to apply.
  • The analysis for Salmonella spp. will continue to apply but the rate will be reduced to 5 per cent of consignments.
  • The analysis for Escherichia coli will no longer apply.
  • The analysis for coagulase-positive staphylococci will no longer apply.

Cooked and processed meat that is ready-to-eat (other than cooked and processed dried meat that is ready-to-eat) may continue to be analysed for pesticide residues.

Further details of the new requirements are available on the Tests applied to risk food webpage.

The Compendium of Microbiological Criteria for Food (FSANZ) is available at this link.


FSANZ’s media issues for the week

Labelling

The ‘Australian Made, Australian Grown’ logo celebrated its 30th year in use, attracting formal recognition by the Prime Minister in Canberra this week. Read more.

As part a proposed Country of Origin Labelling Bill set to be introduced to Parliament this week, local producers will receive recognition on food labelling, with ingredients’ country of origin and what portion of the product each country accounted for to be displayed on the proposed labelling. Read the ‘berry good’ news here.

New Zealand’s Food Safety Minister Jo Goodhew has welcomed progress on improving food labelling, including consistent labelling of added fats and oils that are high in saturated fatty acids, following her attendance at the Australia and New Zealand Ministerial Forum on Food Regulation. Read the media release here.

Consumers in the US have filed a lawsuit against a popular Mexican-themed fast food restaurant for ‘tricking’ them into consuming more calories than they thought they were consuming through  ‘fraudulent’ labelling. Read more about the confusing situation here.

Food safety

Our recently published third edition of Safe Food Australia has been described as ‘easy to digest’. Read more.

US researchers have found ‘the secret ingredient’ to food safety at home–including reminders to wash hands and use meat thermometers in recipes! Check out the research here.

A study from French government researchers has reported new results on the exposure of pregnant women to more than 100 substances including BPA, which they are claiming might be a concern for the health of a developing foetus. Read more here.

Calling all cheese fanatics! Are you up to date with the latest science and nutrition advice on all things cheesy?  Get your fromage facts here.

Sticking with cheese, a new software has been developed to help small, artisan cheesemakers determine whether raw milk cheese products meet requirements in the Food Standards Code. Find out more here.

If you’re prone to eating your way into a food coma at Christmas time, you might want to rethink your serving of ham, as one recent study has recent study suggests the meat contributes to migraines. Read more.

Food regulation

Health supplements in India can no longer be sold as ‘medicines’, with food safety watchdog FSSAI announcing new standards for manufacturers to check mislabeling. Read more.

McDonald’s in the US says a new ‘dramatic’ menu switch to fresh, never-frozen beef patties represents a massive challenge for the restaurant, but believes the move has the potential to pay off through an improved public image and better-tasting burgers. Read more.

Australia’s thriving seafood trade goes under the microscope in the SBS documentary ‘What’s The Catch?’—from the same series as the recently aired ‘For The Love of Meat’. Read more.

Diet and nutrition

The author of this article is sick of ‘Paleo Pete’ not letting the facts get in the way of a good story. The author claims ‘when people argue [against him] with logic, evidence and facts, Pete attacks. He labels nutritionists as corrupt…’ Check out the full article here.

Most smartphone nutrition apps are inadequate, according to a new analysis. Read about the analysis.

Christmas doesn’t have to destroy your healthy eating habits—see these festive food swaps.

After years of dieting, an obese and frustrated journalist found that following a plant-based approach to eating  was the key to shedding weight she’d previously struggled with. Read the article: How I got fat and what I’m doing about it.

GMO

The common perception that organic fruit is safer than their GM counterparts is leading some low income Americans to avoid fruit all together. Check out the research here.

Quirky

Domino’s Pizza’s ‘Delivery Integrated Researchers’ in Japan are trying to figure out how to get reindeer to deliver pizza. You can’t make this stuff up…Check out how they’re going here.


Food Standards Notification circular 30-16  2 December 2016 

The latest Notification Circular (30–16) was published on 2 December 2016.

The Circular summarises work currently being undertaken or finalised by FSANZ including:

  •  A1136 –  Protein Glutaminase as a Processing Aid (Enzyme)

imported-food-notice-20-16-published

Imported Food Notice 20-16.has been published to advise brokers and importers about upcoming changes to the inspection and analysis of cooked and processed meat that is ready-to-eat.

The notice can be accessed via the following link – http://www.agriculture.gov.au/import/goods/food/notices


Release of FSANZ Risk Statements for Imported Foods

Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) would like to provide you with notification that a number of Risk Statements for Imported Foods have been formally advised to the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources and publicly released on its website. No media release is planned. The webpage for FSANZ advice on imported food is http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/consumer/importedfoods/Pages/FSANZ-advice-on-imported-food.aspx

Under the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act 1991, FSANZ has a function to develop assessment policies in relation to food imported into Australia. FSANZ performs this function by providing advice to the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources on the foods that pose a medium to high risk to public health. The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources then uses this advice to determine risk management measures for food entering Australia. For further information please refer to: http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/consumer/importedfoods/Pages/default.aspx

Risk Statements have been published for:

  • Bean curd
  • Dried coconut
  • Dried paprika and pepper
  • Marinara mix
  • Ready-to-eat cooked crustaceans
  • Ready-to-eat cooked prawns and shrimp
  • Ready-to-eat processed bivalve molluscs
  • Sesame seeds and sesame seed products

 

 

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